About your Search

20121201
20121201
STATION
CSPAN2 11
MSNBCW 10
CNNW 8
FBC 7
SFGTV 5
SFGTV2 5
CSPAN 3
KNTV (NBC) 3
KQED (PBS) 3
KQEH (PBS) 3
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 2
CNBC 1
COM 1
KGO (ABC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 73
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
science funding, everyone would be in . >> that's one of my lines. okay and i believe this for a long time. for a long time i was a free market guy i would say there are exceptions. let's not be extremists here. it's okay to have a free market in shoes, there are some things the market can't provide. i would thought obviously science is one of those. you can't necessarily earn a profit on basic science. it doesn't turn an immediate profit. you can't always capture the profit from science your competitor will grab the discovery and earn the profit. therefore will beless science undertaken. it's a typical neoclassical model. it's not going work in the free market. i believe it. it's it turns out it's not the case at all. secondly, the old model that we sort of abide by centuries ago the way science operates is gather data, you exam it, you draw some hypothesis and come up with experiments. and the experiment either confirms or does not confirm it. provisionally confirm or does not confirm the high pot cyst. that's the way science operates. again, that sounds possible but it turns out none of
of ideas embraced since the 1970s that were based on assumptions, not rigorous science. the science that experiments and observations to test those hypothesis has been poor. we have been living with that ever since. we have had an obesity endemic and, epidemic and the question is why is obesity and diabetes increasing so quickly? >> john: good question. you are an md, you went to stanford and residency at john hopkins, the nutritional instruction you got wasn't good? >> that is a great point. i thought it was. i followed it myself and told everyone around me to follow it. about three or four years ago i wound up being 40 pounds overweight even though i was exercising and eating the right food supposedly. it had me questioning what i was believing and what it was i was preaching as dogma. >> john: let's back up. in 1977 our government came out with dietary goals for you. increase carbohydrate consumption 50% of your calories reduce fat from 40 to 30%. this is based on research that led to the famous food pyramid that told to us eat lots of breads and vegetables, fruits, less meat and
't happen in the united states, doesn't it, science is everywhere. >> the same science,. >> really? >> in geneva as in new york city. >> but during the cold war when we were fighting the soviets our german scientists were better than their. >> different in different places. >> just want to make sure. explain to me again because i understand it when you explain it to me but the moment you leave the room it evaporates out of my head. >> coy explain that using science. >> okay, okay. what is the higg-bosan and why is it. >> so bag-- back in the day the early 60s fis quist-- physicists were try tounged stand the nuclear forces that hold together the nuclear a tomorrow and they couldn't. they kept coming up with this idea that it was spread out all over the place which it clearly doesn't so they came up with this bizarre-sounding idea that empath-- empty space is filled with an energy field every with. >> impossible. >> no, not-- we just got evidence that it's true. >> stephen: no, i'm going-- [bleep] because-- (laughter) >> stephen: it is not empty space if it is filled with something.
to augment. >> when you hear that, this is science fiction. you created this science fact. you brought it in for us to see. is this 20 years from now, 10 years? what is your sense? this is unbelievable to the average person's imagination. you can't imagine the ability for nano technology and synthetic byiology all these interdisciplinaries coming together. >> there isn't a single thing that doesn't exist. what does it take to commercialize it. how long in the lab we can physically print the human kidney. on the other hand the same doctor who did that has already printed a human bladder that has been implanted. >> wow. >> so we're on the road to do these things. but none of it is science fiction. we're not making things up. for example when we say you take dna and you reorganize it, and then you look under electron microscope, and that shape that you imagined is there in the electron microscope, and you go, this is real. people don't under that you can now mail order dna. i want strands composed of these, you put it in the booker and thenbeekerand you mix it pup it up. unbelievable thin
have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
. they are committed to science and social studies, arts, and other enrichment opportunities for all of our students. even in our mostpkñ?ñ? historicy underserved schools, schools that previously wereÑññ?ñ? underachieving, the following examples illustrate in concrete terms the district -- to educating the entire child. framework has encouraged non-fiction reading especially in science and social studies. schools have purchased additional books with the funds available and material tolqñ?ñ? support student learning in all of the -- our school improvement grantrñ?ñ? leveraged resources e permitted us to make significant investments in technology and hardware that is being used across the curriculum. and in particular these investments further have>éñ?ñ? enhanced student interaction and engagement with science and social studies and even the arts curriculum. student funding has permitted the school to hire additional pe teachersióñ?ñ? while providing n planning relief time for classroom teachers to continue to collaborate. it is because of this whole child approach that we have to lear
, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn, those exposures are out t
. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes au
-opportunities a summer science program[me teachers that focus on a youth p.o.w. wow. ask the commissioner fewer to read the rest. >> commissioner fewer: whereas the parent advisory committee of the indian education program consists of parentsñ?ñ?ñ aides representatives, teachers administration and community members to -- on the distribution of the research provided for the program based on multiple data sources for a variety of services, and where pac empowers families, students and community6ó?n<ñq8 members and community to members that take an active and substantial role in thexét8k children's educationvx%f experience and whereas the program continues to collaborate with local÷ 2í3 ensure the delivery of quality services to support the:g(úbgd educational and cultural5]o+ and alaskan native studentsrvy'a including thewto9wa% american program san francisco and the urban trail san francisco system of care project, friendship house association indians-p<í='e, inc. of san francisco youth program. the2 s ák beço boardt
want to be in congress before. that's coming up. >>> there's a school of no so much political science as sort of political pseudo science that says what the price of gas is determines our elections. it's not necessarily true. it sounds compelling but the more facts you look at, the correlation is not really bourn out over time. it's one of those things that get passed on as if it's a truth that people like to believe in. whether or not it is true. and in newt gingrich's slow run at the presidency this year, it seems like newt gingrich maybe got enamored with that wise tale. he thought he would take miz presidential campaign about gas prices for awhile. thereby creating the impression that gas prices might go down under him if he were elected president. that was his planned road to the white house for awhile. that road did not lead to the white house. it didn't even lead to a fox news gig. what's he doing now any way? gas prices are not just politically sailing. they are sailing it because they are sail yant to our economy, the price of gas has an impact on how much pocket change ameri
to be destroyed already. >> how much environmental damage can an oyster farm do, and what did the science say about the damage that they were doing? >> that's what's interesting here. the science was the most political part of this. so the national parks service did an impact study. they said, well, we think that they do damage to the local habitat and they are disturbing harbor seals in the area, and that became very political. you have people saying they didn't do a fair job of that, and it was actually reviewed by a department of science who initially got the data, so you can see it became a debate. >> what's this going to mean for people who like to go up there and buy oysters? they're going to close soon? >> they have 90 days. there are still oyster farms in point rays, but this happened to be in an area designated as potential wilderness, and that was kind of the real problem here. it had been slated as potential wilderness as the highest level of protection that the federal government can give to a place. >> i think they produced 40% of the oysters in california, or they come from ther
of time. smith has been asked to chair the science committee. i charge you and beg you to get him to watch your movie. i age that appointment would disturb you. >> in fact, we have distributed copies of this film to every member of the senate and the house. of course we have no idea if it's been watched by any of the members of congress but i really hope that they will. the thing that really killed me, and just overwhelms me sometimes is the knowledge that we here in america, in our current time and place, we have all the knowledge. we are the leaders internationally in observing these place from the ground, and observing how climate change is changing the world from ocean bowies to research slips to lied on the ground, it's just that they've been trying to ignore the tangible information and evidence that the best minds of our time are accumulateing and amassing. it grieves me to think that somebody in such an influential leadership position has been so eagerly and aggressively denying what has been a clear and obvious charge to our society and the rest of the world. >> jennifer: i cannot
science. john: you have a book called "good calories, bad calories." but i know that a calorie is a calorie. >> the reason we get that is because we take in more energy than we expected. it becomes a unit of heat. protein, fat, the different types of carbohydrates, the glucose from fructose sugar, they all have different effects. whether or not you will store calories as fat order there will not the calories come up with a hormonal effects of the food. how much energy bring to us. john: but the u.s. department of health says a calorie is a calorie. >> it just hasn't been tested. one of the things we did when i started this organization. john: this being? >> the nutritionist study. we went back to world war ii to every scientist that attempted to answer that question. we found 82 studes that have attempteto answer that. they were all probably the same limitations and problems. in 2012, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence. a calorie is not a calorie, necessarily. john: one thing that absolutely must be true if you should eat less fat. yet you eat lots of fat. and you're a docto
. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. >>> there's a school of not so much political science as sort of political pseudoscience. that says what the price of gas is determined what happens in our national elections. now, it is not necessarily true. it's the kind of correlation that sounds really compelling but the more facts you look at the correlation is not really bourn out over time. it's one of those things that gets passed on as if it's a political science truth that people like to believe in, whether or not it is true. in newt going rich's slow run at the presidency this year, it seems like mr. gingrich maybe got enamored with the fake political science wise tale. i think he thought he could reverse engineer it by making his presidential campaign about gas prices for a while. thereby creating the impression nothing voters that gas prices might go down under him if he were elected president. that was his planned road to the white house for awhile. that road did not lead to the white house. it didn't even lead to a fox news gig. apparently. what is newt gingrich doing now
get that at the best technical schools in the prison. >> studying math and science and under the strict supervision of nasa, these inmates are building metal cubes that may some day carry miniature satellites into space. >> do you program this? >> we sit here and they are proud of what they learned. >> i didn't know the name ofs or how to use them. >> richard runs the shop. >> i'm really finicky about the work they do. >> a veteran, the peace keeper missile and space shuttle, this job is the most rewarding. >> to not only watch the guys grow with their skills. >> here they help each other, a stark contrast to the outside where turf is divided by race. black, white, mexican and asian. >> you go for these guys? >> i do. >> in fact crafting metal armed him with two national certificates. >> you come to prison and you think it's gloom and doom and you find yourself somewhere with a lost opportunity. you take advantage of it. >> for caesar who will be out soon, using tools to shape metal has given him tools to save his life. >> it will give me the skills to find a job. >> melting
certainly reviewed it, and the results look promising. it is like the rest of science, we'll follow where the data leads. we'll leave our politics at the door. >> similar studies are under way in europe and canada. and he is offering treatments for veterans, firefighters and police officers. and here with me now is rachel hope. and you know i should start off by pointing out because people watch that, nobody is saying that street ecstasy is safe. a lot of times you don't know what you're getting, for sure if you're not in a controlled setting what it is doing to you. but that was not to situation for you, necessarily. you were doing this in a controlled setting. what was it like? you had never done anything like this before. >> yeah, i had never done anything like that. but it made it so comfortable for me, and prepared me, so when i -- i got the medicine, i had an idea what would happen. but it was pretty remarkable. >> you described it, if i remember correctly, like your brain lit up like a christmas tree. most people have no idea what that means, they have never done this. >> i don't e
of science. >> this is something that leadership needs to talk about. as a storyteller i know we have to get the story out there. climate change is happening. we immediately have to start transforming our economy to renewable energy. that's totally duible. we can run everything we have right now off existing technology from the wind and the sun and renewable energy. the second thing, it's an incredible economic benefit and economic engine to this area. there are community centers out on the rockaways that have power because greenpeace pulled up with a solar array on the back of a truck and that distributed generated energy helps people. >> eliot: it is unfortunately an event to drive home the reality of what you can do at a moment of distress when you need to find alternative energy sources. you've done that. i want to pivot a little bit. the occupy movement has morphed into something different. it's changed it's imagery and providing real services to real people. is that going to be a continueing transformation? is this a new cause for occupy. >> one would argue that they were a disaster or
graduate with skills that we need. people around the world with accredited degrees in science and math. get a green card and come to the u.s. of a. >> don't get too excited. the stem jobs act would give visas to 55,000 immigrant who have advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or math, stem. the problem with the bill, only 27 democrats supported, is that it would eliminate 55,000 visas from the diversity visa program. the diversity visa program is a lottery system to provide immigrants from areas with low immigration rates with the clans it come to america. democratic congresswoman of california represents silicon valley. they are the prime beneficiary, arguably, of more high skilled immigration. she is not a fan of this bill. she said this give and take approach of immigration is like a grover norquist style pledge. signing with anti-immigrant groups to never create a green card immigrant without taking one away from someone else. it isn't likely to pass in the senate since charles schumer and chris coons added a stem bill without the visa program. the obama administration sai
getting equal pay or moving ahead is so few women take on science, technology, education and math. i went to school as an engineer in the 80s and was the only woman in the program. ten years later i still don't find any women who become save the engineers the way i did. is there a way to push the younger generation to take those harder courses and break those barriers? >> there is some work to do that and the educational system is stepping up to do that but then you come up against the situation they discovered at yale, that even though women have the same qualifications they are not treated equally. >> we have to encourage women. that is one area in technology and science where women have not made has significant a role as they have in law and medicine and it starts early. it starts in kindergarten where you have to encourage that. i saw the same study but be that as it may women make a lot more money -- [talking over each other] >> in the liberal arts. >> something you want to say? we have time for one more question. >> no, go ahead. the other people talk. >> sandra fluke went to orgasm
business studios, here is gerri willis. gerri: math and science experts. its known as the stem jobs act. science technology engineering and math. all the stuff that we need. it is unliky that there will be passed in the democratic controlled senate. granting residency to young people brought into the country legally, some are calling this is achieved back. the gop version of the dream act. we have senator kay bailey hutchison with us. senator, welcome back. >> thank you for having me. gerri: tells how your legislation is different from the dream act? >> are legislation gives the legal status to the young people who are really in a conundrum. they have grown up here. >> we do give them a legal status and we don't pretend that i'm forgetting in line if they choose to go that citizenship route. >> you have to be under 14 years old when you came here, you have to be under 28-year-olds now. you can serve four years in the military areas or you can have six years in which to get some kind of job training or degree. college degree or a vocation degree. something that gives you a skill. from th
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. >> shepard: some survivors of super storm sandy got steamed staten island in new york. hundreds jammed in auditorium to talk with officials fema. people said they were frustrated with the recovery effort. >> you sit there -- you think it's a joke? >> billionaires. >> i don't. >> our communities are helping. red cross comes by, rings their bell come and get a hot meal and leave. we help each other. and that's what we want to do. but we need your support, sir. >> shepard: always quite new yorkers. staten island seriously the hardest hit spot in the city. new york's mayor has estimated the total damage i
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children and adolescents in particular may be at an increased risk of seizures, confusion or abnormal behavior. the most common side effects are mild to moderate nausea and vomiting. the flu comes on fast, so ask your doctor about tamiflu. prescription for flu. >>> it is time! it
of representatives voted today to allow foreign students getting advanced degrees in science and math from american schools to get green cards. it's a move that got a lot of backing from the tech industry, especially in the silicon valley. and at least in the house, fairly bipartisan support. but it is controversial, even among democrats, because the new plan would eliminate an earlier plan that gave green cards to other groups, including immigrants from africa. >>> well, in the east bay, a former teacher of the year has been sentenced to almost five years in prison for possessing child pornography. 28-year-old alex bersch was ordered to spend five years behind bars and fined $2,000. he was a popular teacher at los madonos school and a coach for a swim team. police found pornographic videos and images of children on his home computer. >>> a $10,000 reward is being offered for information leading to the arrest for a suspect who shot at a milpitas police officer. investigators say they pulled over a man tuesday morning. the man inside opened fire but missed the officer but hit his car. he got away in
students with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. the republican measure drew fire from democrats, some democrats, some going so far as to level the measure racist. >> that is racist if not in its intent then certainly in its effect. republicans have received were just received historically low votes from minorities in the past election, yet they want to create an immigration system that gives vises with one hand while taking them away from minorities with the other. lou: joining as now, the co-author of numerous anti illegal immigration laws in a kansas secretary of state, also with us, the attorney, executive director of the national immigration forum. good to have you with t cards in a lottery. i'm not kidding. we were giving them away in a lottery all over the world. what this does is take those 55,000 visas and gives them away in a way that serves our national interest to people who have advanced degrees and can help our country. in contrast, the itsy act which is a different bill that went to the senate, i think that is a disaster. basically just a r
, with a "sharp- edged" weapon. classroom in a science building.. killed the teacher.. then killed himself in front of students. police say, the man was not a student.. but he did apparently know his victims. the army private charged with leaking classified information to the web site wikileaks, says he was considering suicide during his pre-trial confinement. bradley manning testified on the fourth day of a hearing at fort meade near baltimore. he admitted he went as far as fashioning a noose out of a bedsheet in his cell. manning is trying to get the case against him dismissed.. he claims he was punished illegally, by being held for nine -months in restrictive conditions. charges that could put him his life, if convicted. a missouri family has come forward as one of two winners in wednesday's but a second confirmed winner, who purchased the golden ticket at a store in suburban phoenix, still has not been publicly identified. shelby lin has the bonanza. this for a touchdown >> we are common as anybody, which is tablet a bit more money, we want to try to keep everything norm
art institute. i haven't heard california college of arts and sciences, but i'm sure there are many, many more that would probably have some things they could bring to the table and draft something that worked in a cooperative manner. so, i'm probably in favor of a continuance. it might not have to be a long one. maybe mattious might be able to give us an idea how long you think it might take if we had a continuance to get together with these groups. if you wanted to give me some input on that, i'd be happy to have some guidance as to how long a period of time you feel you'd be able to work out the various outreach that we're talking about. * >> being unaware of your schedule, and i know that the board of supervisors will go into recess in two weeks. but i believe that to be on the safe side, something around mid january would probably be the safest so that there will be time both before and after the holidays to conduct those conversations. [speaker not understood]. >> great, thank you. okay, those were my main feelings. >> commissioner borden. >> yeah, i do have a question for sta
golden gate park. the museum and the academy of sciences and so many other institutions. but also, a lot of community arts centers. there is all these community arts space is that i just love, and it makes our neighborhoods a much more colorful and livable as well. >> what motivated your interest in politics? >> i guess i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign process? was anything surprising? supervis
and they did a parody of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an earthquake and the initial problem was crush injuries. yes, infection and dysentery and water supply and all those things would follow fairly soon, but the initial catastrophe was crush injuries, trauma, and the hospitals were gone. so what did we do? the world responded as best it could. what we did, the naval maritime forces, we sent our balts group down there which was patroling the area, we sent the hospital ship comfort down. so you have the comfort on the east coast, you have the mercy on the west coast. the mercy is parked down in san diego. it just got back from its asian humanitarian assistance from guam, indonesia, vietnam, an amazing number of nations we're partnering with. those hospital ships with 1,000 beds, 12 operatin
do in the next 30 years. this is new, exciting science here on world aids day that we actually know that we can end the aids pandemic if we just get a small number of people, about 18 million people on to treatment by 2015. but we need to move forward to steal a slogan from president obama and need to get past these ridiculous budget cuts that right now are frankly just targeting only poor people, poor people with aids around the country and around the world. >> we know that nudity was a way to get attention for a very important topic and good to speak with you this morning. >> thank you so much. i want to give a shout out for stratogizing the idea of nudity. thank you so much. happy birthday to my son, flynn robert walker. >> happy birthday. jennifer flynn, thank you so much. >>> well, after today, there will be a star missing from the galaxy. today's mls final will mark the end of an era for professional soccer in the u.s. we'll have all the details. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ]
for college you're able to access living wage jobs and if you don't have math and science classes that are required a through g you're not going to be able to go into apprenticeship for building and trade programs. so this is an important policy for the city. unfortunately with our first two classes the level of cuts that they've been experienced has not allowed our school district to fully support the program that is needed to do that. i think, also, with our city passing really the highest budget that we have seen in our city's history i think it's more important than ever that we really step our support for your families and our kids. that being said i think that there are a lot of conversations in kind of moving targets as we're finding different moneys coming in from the last fiscal year so i wanted to allow greater time for a conversation to happen about both sources of funding and also specifically how this investment that the city is making, in our class of 2014-15 are going to be met over the next two weeks. so i would like to make a motion to continue this item as well t
is experimenting with is a program that dhs science and technology created and if you are ready to write it down, you can look online, you can google it, it's called the next generation incident command system or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 2007, i
science and conservation biology at ucla so hopefully there is some input i can put in the subject. what i want to focus on is the aspect of stewardship in this issue. ecosystems are a very fragile organism. ze you can say, and there are organisms involved in it. tampering with even the smallest piece of that could have dire consequences. and as we can see with the gulf folks they have tampered with the ecosystem. the frog eggs as they have moved from the original location. something as simple as that could cause awful things to happen to the ecosystem. and if these gulf folks are so free to even tamper with that, then who knows what could come next. it's not out of their character to try to evade the process of ceqa. that is what they are trying to do right now. what we can hope to do is stop them from getting away with this so that hopefully other institutions similar to them will not be able to do this very same thing in the future. thank you. >> next speaker. >>> hi, i'm virginia marshall from the sequoia audubon society and we do also support this resolution for reasons that have bee
value-added economy and that doesn't just mean skills like math and science although we are lagging behind 30 or 40 other countries in the world in that regard. it also means skills associated with creativity and innovation because our edge as a country comes in the area where we can use our creativity but we also protect creativity in a way that places like china and others don't. in a content driven world, software driven world, that combination of creative people, a system that promotes and protect creativity is probably the real ace in the hole. >> host: let's take bob's comment and tie that to your previous book superclass. you have mentioned we are creating a class of people way up here and everyone else is being left behind in a sense. >> guest: the gap is growing between the ridges 1% and the rest of us. they have benefited more than anyone else in the course of the past week in years. most of the gains that have come with 90% of the gains that have come from the last expansion went to them. people at the bottom of society are more likely to stay there than ever before. we u
with a sharp edge weapon. he entered a classroom and at the science building and killed the teacher and then killed himself and from students. if they stated that he was not is still in but he did know the victim. >> the army private that leaked information to the website weekly is considering suicide. they stated that he testified friday and he admitted that he went as far as trying to kill itself with his seat. he was trying to get the case dismissed and he stated that he was punished illegally. he stated that he would tell my mother and restrictive duties. they stated if he is charged he can be put in jail for rest of his life if convicted. >> and missouri family stated that $587 million power bought tickets. the missouri lottery officials stated that they issued them this oversized check. cindy's stated that she bought the ticket headed fool martlet wednesday night and this was hours before the draw. the couple stated that they would share their wealth with their children and their adoptive daughter. they also plan to donate to charities and lottery officials are still working t
provide green cards pr those skilled in science and technology and math. foreign internationals who have earned degrees from an american university can stay here and use their skills to improve the american workforce. sounds like a great idea, right? sure, but it does so at the expense of other immigrants. and as "the new york times" points out, it eliminates another visa category entirely. the visas set aside for people from countries with low immigration rates to the united states. so the 55,000 stem visas would come at the expense of 55,000 diversity visas. that's a zero sum gain. the elimination of diversity visas would primary affect immigrants from african countries. but despite the discriminatory nature of the bill, republicans insist it's going to create jobs and they are calling out the democrats opposition to the legislation. >> once again, the house is taking the lead on legislation that is going to help create jo jobs. >> we believe as this was the first step forward in terms of trying to address the need for modernization in our visa laws. >> the democrats had two years to d
kiersten a senior political science major at colorado state university. he would think is a graduating senior at the number one thing i would care about would be getting a job. and i guess in a way that's what a lot of people are thinking about. but i actually want to be a local government practitioner. and so i'm thinking about the debt in a totally different way. i think if we allow things to go as they are or make a decision that isn't the right decision, will find yourself unable to provide service is to local areas that we have promised, that we need and i hope to one day be a paradise. in in addition to that, fix that has amazing core principle is that regardless of where you come from, you can find a way to rally around. so reducing spending, tax reform and entitlement reform are all thinks he can come to the table and talk about. i am here urging that uses do that. thanks. >> thank you very much. finally we'll hear from wanda rohm, founder and owner presto prints and in san antonio. she's a long-standing advocate for small and women owned businesses. >> i think being a small bu
then drove to the science building killed a faculty member in front of the students then committed suicide. witness told police the killer used a bow and arrow. he was not a student. police say he knew the victims although they have not said washington the relationship wa was. >>> there was a terrifying scene in a small town in new jersey today. train derailment set a hazardous gas spewing that the air. more than 70 people sought medical treatment from the fumes. lindsaydavis tonight on the hidden risk passing through towns every day. >> thousands of gallons of the hazardous chemical vinyl chloride spewed into the air prosecute the ruptured car. resident told to stay in the home. 3 schools within a mile ordered to keep students indoors. >> we are saying to all watching this that live within the borough of paul's borrow it's a sign for caution. >>reporter: 71 people admitted to local hospital. vinyl chloride is a colorless gas. inhague it can cause problems breathing high levels can cause loss of consciousness and extremely high levels can cause death. >> there are concerns about th
sciences or any type of natural hazard. you should have items like radios and flashlights. three-day of food and water for everyone in the family and manual can opener. for developing an emergency plan for your family is posted at abc7news.com. >> in the sierra truckee width is expected to overflow the banks beginning early tomorrow morning. state of emergency has been declared for douglas county. preparations is well underway. they are filling sandbags in an industrial section of sparks that could be under four feet of water by 7:00 tomorrow night. it's expected to reach four feet above flood stage. in california the truckee river is expected to flood between squaw creek and the town of truckee there is potential for major damage. >>> rain in the bay area means snow in the sierra and ski resorts do plan on being open. kirkwood provided these pictures showing what it looks like. kirkwood, heavenly and northstar all plan to be open today. we know the lifts are idle at sugar bowl. sugar bowl will be closed because of high winds, squaw valley and alpine meadows reported high winds a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)